Cops raid German bloke’s house after his Alexa music device ‘held a party on its own’

AMAZON GRACE Cops raid German bloke’s house after his Alexa music device ‘held a party on its own’ while he was out

Oliver Haberstroh's door was broken down by irate cops after flat after neighbours complained about deafening music blasting from inside

By Jacob Dirnhuber 8th November 2017, 8:18 pm Updated: 9th November 2017, 12:23 am

A GERMAN man has been left with a huge bill after his Amazon Echo tried to organise a house party while he was away.

Hamburg cops were forced to break into Oliver Haberstroh's flat after neighbours complained about deafening music blasting from inside - but found the apartment empty after searching each room for someone to tell off.

Mr Haberstroh claims he walked out of his flat to meet friend on Friday night after checking that the lights and music were switched off.

He wrote on Facebook: "While I was relaxed and enjoying a beer, Alexa managed on her own, without command and without me using my mobile phone, to switch on at full volume and have her own party in my apartment"

"She decided to have it at a very inconvenient time, between 1.50am and 3.00am. My neighbours called the police."

After knocking on the door, the officers called an expert to break the lock open - and refused to hand over keys for the replacement until they'd been paid for the locksmith.

A police spokesman said the source of the noise was "a black jukebox which is usually activated by voice control".

It comes just weeks after a mischievous parrot used Alexa to order itself a set of ten gift boxes while the owner was away.

Alexa is an "intelligent personal assistant" that can be installed on Amazon Echo smart speakers, which allows owners to play music and control the lighting and thermostat by voice command.



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