Posts

Showing posts from 2019

Guardians of money bristle at Zuckerberg's new financial order

Guardians of money bristle at Zuckerberg's new financial order
Alastair Marsh, Bloomberg News June 23, 2019
People don't trust Facebook with their data, how will they trust them with their money?
Facebook Inc. was hours away from the formal announcement of its ambitious foray into financial services, but French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire was already broadcasting his discontent.
"It’s out of the question’’ that the social-media giant’s digital money compete with sovereign currencies, Le Maire said.
That was just the first shot in a torrent of criticism and skepticism from policy makers around the world. U.S. House Financial Services Committee Chair Maxine Waters promised an aggressive response from Congress. Former European Central Bank Vice President Vitor Constancio called the initiative “unreliable and dangerous.”
Led by the social network with more users than the combined population of China and the U.S., the project represents a potential challenge that the guar…

Artificial Intelligence may not take your job, but it could become your boss

Artificial Intelligence may not take your job, but it could become your boss
Critics have accused companies of using algorithms for managerial tasks, saying that automated systems can dehumanize and unfairly punish employees.
In all of the worry about the potential of AI to replace rank-and-file workers, we may have overlooked the possibility it will replace the bosses, too, columnist Kevin Roose says.
Written by Kevin Roose By New York Times |Updated: June 24, 2019 8:24:53 am
When Conor Sprouls, a customer service representative in the call center of insurance giant MetLife talks to a customer over the phone, he keeps one eye on the bottom-right corner of his screen. There, in a little blue box, A.I. tells him how he’s doing.
Talking too fast? The program flashes an icon of a speedometer, indicating that he should slow down.
Sound sleepy? The software displays an “energy cue,” with a picture of a coffee cup.
Not empathetic enough? A heart icon pops up.
For decades, people have fear…

Bombshell: Google Exec Caught on Hidden Camera Reveals Meddling in 2020 Elections

Image
Bombshell: Google Exec Caught on Hidden Camera Reveals Meddling in 2020 ElectionsBy  Avi AbelowJune 24, 2019
This should rock the foundations of the hi-tech world. Google should be punished, if not by the government then by the public. This is outright premeditated meddling by Google to influence the upcoming elections and stop President Trump from being reelected. Where is the outcry? It is finally being exposed by Google employees themselves! Already two years ago it was clear to me that this was happening. I called it the post-Trump election purge. Right after the 2016 elections, hi-tech executives at Google, Facebook and Twitter were issuing comments blaming themselves for Trump’s election win. Why were they blaming themselves? Because they said that they “allowed fake news” to spread to spread and it was based on the fake news that people voted for Trump. Now listen to the full video about the Google expose and don’t miss the Google insider explain how Google manipulates the searc…

At Work, Expertise Is Falling Out of Favor - Implications for the nature and utility of a college education

At Work, Expertise Is Falling Out of Favor
These days, it seems, just about all organizations are asking their employees to do more with less. Is that actually a good idea?
JERRY USEEMJULY 2019 ISSUE
In the faint predawn light, the ship doesn’t look unusual. It is one more silhouette looming pier-side at Naval Base San Diego, a home port of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. And the scene playing out in its forward compartment, as the crew members ready themselves for departure, is as old as the Navy itself. Three sailors in blue coveralls heave on a massive rope. “Avast!” a fourth shouts. A percussive thwack announces the pull of a tugboat—and 3,000 tons of warship are under way.
But now the sun is up, and the differences start to show.
Most obvious is the ship’s lower contour. Built in 2014 from 30 million cans’ worth of Alcoa aluminum, Littoral Combat Ship 10, the USS Gabrielle Giffords, rides high in the water on three separate hulls and is powered like a jet ski—that is, by water-breathing…

Amazon Patents Creepy Drone Technology To Spy On Your Home

Amazon Patents Creepy Drone Technology To Spy On Your Home
by Tyler Durden Fri, 06/21/2019 - 15:05
According to a new patent awarded to Amazon on June 4 by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) could "perform a surveillance action" over the home of an Amazon customer. It's being dubbed as "surveillance as a service," is a disturbing reminder that corporate America not only wants to monitor your search trends and social media posts but now wants to monitor the outside of your home.
A network of delivery drones would film Amazon customers' homes from the skies while on their way to delivering packages. Artificial intelligence will observe the property for anything unusual during the flyover, such as broken windows, doors left open, and unauthorized people on the property. Customers can request security flyovers hourly, daily, or weekly, the patent said.
The patent explained, depending on the drone design and …

Review: Google Chrome has become surveillance software. It’s time to switch.

Review: Google Chrome has become surveillance software. It’s time to switch.
Our latest privacy experiment found Chrome ushered more than 11,000 tracker cookies into our browser — in a single week. Here’s why Firefox is better.
By Geoffrey A. Fowler | The Washington Post Columnist June 22, 2019 at 9:14 am
You open your browser to look at the web. Do you know who is looking back at you?
Over a recent week of web surfing, I peered under the hood of Google Chrome and found it brought along a few thousand friends. Shopping, news and even government sites quietly tagged my browser to let ad and data companies ride shotgun while I clicked around the web.
This was made possible by the web’s biggest snoop of all: Google. Seen from the inside, its Chrome browser looks a lot like surveillance software.
Lately I’ve been investigating the secret life of my data, running experiments to see what technology really is up to under the cover of privacy policies that nobody reads. It turns out, having …

Japanese sign up for DNA matchmaking as country faces demographic crisis

Japanese sign up for DNA matchmaking as country faces demographic crisis By Danielle Demetriou, Tokyo 22 JUNE 2019 • 1:57PM
The scene resembles a typical blind speed-dating event: 13 women and 13 men, seated on either side of a bamboo screen in an upmarket Tokyo restaurant, are chatting in pairs on a strictly timed three-minute rotation.
But the doctor hovering on the fringes and the scientific documents held in the participant’s hands, however, offer a hint that this is no ordinary dating event: for everyone attending has undergone a DNA test in a bid to find their best romantic match.
Welcome to the world of DNA matchmaking. Forget hobbies, professions, ages or nose sizes: one critical new criteria for finding the perfect partner was recently added to Japan’s fast-paced dating world, with the launch of a new service that promises to find love based on genetic compatibility.
Created by the dating company Nozze., which operates 21 branches across Japan, DNA Matching works with scient…

Horns are growing on young people's skulls. Phone use is to blame, research suggests.

Horns are growing on young people's skulls. Phone use is to blame, research suggests.Isaac Stanley-Becker, The Washington Post  11:18 am EDT, Thursday, June 20, 2019
Mobile technology has transformed the way we live - how we read, work, communicate, shop and date. But we already know this.
What we have not yet grasped is the way the tiny machines in front of us are remolding our skeletons, possibly altering not just the behaviors we exhibit but the bodies we inhabit.
New research in biomechanics suggests that young people are developing hornlike spikes at the back of their skulls - bone spurs caused by the forward tilt of the head, which shifts weight from the spine to the muscles at the back of the head, causing bone growth in the connecting tendons and ligaments. The weight transfer that causes the buildup can be compared to the way the skin thickens into a callus as a response to pressure or abrasion.
The result is a hook or hornlike feature jutting out from the skull, just above t…