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U.S. top court tightens patent suit rules in blow to 'patent trolls'

U.S. top court tightens patent suit rules in blow to 'patent trolls'
By Andrew Chung | WASHINGTON Mon May 22, 2017 | 4:18pm EDT
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday tightened rules for where patent lawsuits can be filed in a decision that may make it harder for so-called patent "trolls" to launch sometimes dodgy patent cases in friendly courts, a major irritant for high-tech giants like Apple and Alphabet Inc's Google.
In a decision that upends 27 years of law governing patent infringement cases, the justices sided with beverage flavoring company TC Heartland LLC in its legal battle with food and beverage company Kraft Heinz Co (KHC.O). The justices ruled 8-0 that patent suits can be filed only in courts located in the jurisdiction where the targeted company is incorporated.
The decision overturned a 2016 ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, a Washington-based patent court, that said patent suits are fair game anywhere a defendant company'…

Chinese online retailer developing one-ton delivery drones

Chinese online retailer developing one-ton delivery drones
By JOE MCDONALD, AP BUSINESS WRITER BEIJING — May 22, 2017, 8:38 AM ET
In this image taken from a Nov. 9, 2016 video footage by AP Video, a drone takes off to deliver JD.com parcel from Tiantong'an village near Suqian city in eastern China's Jiangsu province. China's biggest online retailer, JD.com Inc., announced plans Monday, May 22, 2017 to develop drone aircraft capable of carrying a ton or more for long-distance deliveries.
China's biggest online retailer, JD.com Inc., announced plans Monday to develop drone aircraft capable of carrying a ton or more for long-distance deliveries.
The company said it will test the drones on a network it is developing to cover the northern Chinese province of Shaanxi. It said they will carry consumer goods to remote areas and farm produce to cities.
JD.com, headquartered in Beijing, says it made its first deliveries to customers using smaller drones in November. Other e-co…

Google is training computers to predict when you might get sick

Google is training computers to predict when you might get sick
Google Brain is working with top hospitals to predict health outcomes from medical data. That data was stripped of personally-identifiable information before it was shared with Google.
This is the latest in a series of research projects from Google to apply its machine learning expertise to health care.
Christina Farr May 17, 2017
Google is building tools to predict when you'll get sick.
The company is applying its machine learning expertise, which it originally developed for consumer products like Translate and Image Search, to health care. To get there, it worked with hospitals, including Stanford Medicine, UC San Francisco and The University of Chicago Medicine, which stripped millions of patient medical records of personally identifying data and shared them with Google's research team, Google Brain.
"We can improve predictions for medical events that might happen to you," said Katherine Chou, the he…

The man who built a virtual nervous system explains how humans will interact with machines in ten years

The man who built a virtual nervous system explains how humans will interact with machines in ten years
Mark Sagar invented a virtual nervous system that powers autonomous animated avatars. He is best known for developing Baby X, a virtual infant that learns through experience. Sagar says people will learn how to work cooperatively with AI powered robots.
By Chantel McGee May 21, 2017
In ten years artificially intelligent robots will be living and working with us, according to Dr. Mark Sagar, CEO of Soul Machines, an Auckland, New Zealand-based company that develops intelligent, emotionally responsive avatars.
Sagar, an AI engineer, is the inventor of a virtual nervous system that powers autonomous animated avatars like Baby X — a virtual infant that learns through experience and can "feel" emotions.
"We are creating realistic adult avatars serving as virtual assistants. You can use them to plug into existing systems like IBM Watson or Cortana — putting a face on a cha…

Revealed: Facebook's internal rulebook on sex, terrorism and violence

Revealed: Facebook's internal rulebook on sex, terrorism and violence
Leaked policies guiding moderators on what content to allow are likely to fuel debate about social media giant’s ethics
By Nick Hopkins Sunday 21 May 2017 13.00 EDT Last modified on Sunday 21 May 2017 17.43 EDT
Facebook’s secret rules and guidelines for deciding what its 2 billion users can post on the site are revealed for the first time in a Guardian investigation that will fuel the global debate about the role and ethics of the social media giant.
The Guardian has seen more than 100 internal training manuals, spreadsheets and flowcharts that give unprecedented insight into the blueprints Facebook has used to moderate issues such as violence, hate speech, terrorism, pornography, racism and self-harm.
There are even guidelines on match-fixing and cannibalism.
The Facebook Files give the first view of the codes and rules formulated by the site, which is under huge political pressure in Europe and the US.
They i…

Facebook will not delete videos of violent death, abortion and self-harm, leaked guidelines show

Facebook will not delete videos of violent death, abortion and self-harm, leaked guidelines show
By Christopher Hope, CHIEF POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT & Kate McCann,SENIOR POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT 21 MAY 2017 • 8:45PM
Facebook is refusing to delete videos and images of "violent death", abortion and self-harm because the web giant does not want to censor its users, it has emerged.
The American social media giant also allows people to live stream attempts to self-harm because it “doesn’t want to censor or punish people in distress”.
The website's ethical guidelines, which were leaked to The Guardian, revealed that it has instructed staff not to remove controversial content which many would find deeply offensive.
It comes amid a growing row over Facebook's responsibility to remove offensive material from its site. MPs have repeatedly called on the company to do more to take down violent content.
Theresa May, the Prime Minister, said last week she would bring in new po…

Lawsuit challenges Ohio internet harassment law, claiming it stifles criticism of public officials

Lawsuit challenges Ohio internet harassment law, claiming it stifles criticism of public officials
A lawsuit filed Tuesday says Ohio's internet harassment law is overly broad.
By Eric Heisig, cleveland.com on May 17, 2017 at 9:54 AM, updated May 17, 2017 at 4:09 PM
CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A liberal blog and conservative group filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday to challenge an Ohio law passed last year that prohibits internet harassment, saying it's overly broad and infringes on the First Amendment.
The law was passed in April 2016 and went into effect in August. It says "no person shall knowingly post a text or audio statement or an image on an internet web site or web page for the purpose of abusing, threatening or harassing another person." A first-time violation of this law is considered a first-degree misdemeanor.
The lawsuit was filed by the liberal blog Plunderbund, the Portage County Tea Party. Also included as plaintiffs are John Spinelli, who frequently writes for…