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Apple totally lied about the glass back on the iPhone 8

Drop test confirms Apple totally lied about the glass back on the iPhone 8
Zach Epstein September 25th, 2017 at 9:18 AM
When Apple unveiled the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X during its big September press conference a couple of weeks ago, the company said the glass backs on the phones is the strongest glass ever to be used on a smartphone. There’s no reason to beat around the bush: that was a lie. Apple has been known to bend and stretch the truth from time to time, and the company’s executives are nothing if not dramatic while unveiling new products. But the claim that the glass back on the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X is the strongest ever isn’t just dramatic, it’s disingenuous. Don’t believe us? Let’s check out a brand new test that utilized a professional drop test machine.
The glass backs on Apple’s new 2017 iPhone lineup might be really strong. They might even have a copper-infused layer like Apple said on stage earlier this month. But the claim that these phon…

Maureen Dowd: Mark Zuckerberg Very Scary - may be learning what it’s like to be Dr. Frankenstein

Will Mark Zuckerberg ‘Like’ This Column?
Mark Zuckerberg may be learning what it’s like to be Dr. Frankenstein.
By Maureen Dowd SEPT. 23, 2017
WASHINGTON — The idea of Mark Zuckerberg running for president was always sort of scary.
But now it’s really scary, given what we’ve discovered about the power of his little invention to warp democracy.
All these years, the 33-year-old founder of Facebook has been dismissive of the idea that social media and A.I. could be used for global domination — or even that they should be regulated.
Days after Donald Trump pulled out his disorienting win, Zuckerberg told a tech conference that the contention that fake news had influenced the election was “a pretty crazy idea,” showing a “profound lack of empathy” toward Trump voters.
But all the while, the company was piling up the rubles and turning a blind eye as the Kremlin’s cyber hit men weaponized anti-Hillary bots on Facebook to sway the U.S. election. Russian agents also used Facebook and Twitte…

Manufacturers in China ‘ill-prepared for Industry 4.0’

Manufacturers in China ‘ill-prepared for Industry 4.0’ says McKinsey report
Despite being the ‘world’s factory’, its manufacturing productivity is still only a quarter of developed countries
By Wendy Wu PUBLISHED: Monday, 24 April, 2017, 9:02am
Chinese manufacturers are not well prepared to brace for the coming wave of digitalisation to narrow the gap with advanced economies, McKinsey & Company suggest in a report.
McKinsey sent the warning when it launched a Digital Capability Centre at Tsinghua University, the fifth it has set up after ones in the United States, Germany, Italy and Singapore, to facilitate the application of smart production and digital operation to reshape manufacturing.
As the world’s factory, China produced 70 per cent of mobile phones, 80 per cent of air conditioners and 91 per cent of personal computers, but its manufacturing productivity was still only a quarter of developed countries.
Aiming to transfer the country from a manufacturing workshop to a leadi…

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/23/business/media/the-not-so-glossy-future-of-magazines.html

The Not-So-Glossy Future of Magazines
By SYDNEY EMBER and MICHAEL M. GRYNBAUM SEPT. 23, 2017
One evening in mid-September, a gaggle of writers and bon vivant editors gathered by the outdoor fireplace and ivy-covered trellis of a West Village tavern. Steak was served, and the toasts lasted late into the night, the revelry trickling out to the nearby sidewalk.
It could have been a scene from the Jazz Age heyday of the Manhattan magazine set — or even the 1990s, when glossy monthlies still soaked up millions of dollars in advertising revenue, and editors in chauffeured town cars told the nation what to wear, what to watch and who to read.
This night, however, had an elegiac tinge. The staff of Vanity Fair was saluting the magazine’s longtime editor, Graydon Carter, who had announced that he was departing after a 25-year run. In the back garden of Mr. Carter’s restaurant, the Waverly Inn, star writers like James Wolcott and Marie Brenner spoke of their gratitude and grief.
Mr. Carter has…

Chinese robot dentist is first to fit implants in patient’s mouth without any human involvement

Chinese robot dentist is first to fit implants in patient’s mouth without any human involvement
Successful procedure raises hopes technology could avoid problems caused by human error and help overcome shortage of qualified dentists
PUBLISHED: Thursday, 21 September, 2017, 6:30pm UPDATED : Friday, 22 September, 2017, 9:43pm
A robot dentist has carried out the first successful autonomous implant surgery by fitting two new teeth into a woman’s mouth, mainland media has reported.
Although there were human medical staff present during the operation, they did not play an active role while it was being carried out.
The one-hour procedure took place in Xian, Shaanxi, on Saturday, according to Science and Technology Daily.
The implants were fitted to within a margin of error of 0.2-0.3mm, reaching the required standard for this kind of operation, experts said.
The technology was designed to overcome mainland China’s shortage of qualified dentists and frequent surgical errors.
It was develope…

London Mayor Sadiq Khan could be in breach of equality rules over Uber ban

London Mayor Sadiq Khan could be in breach of equality rules as Uber vows to take court action over ban
Uber vows to take court action against Transport for London's ban
By Nicola Harley 23 SEPTEMBER 2017 • 9:24PM
Sadiq Khan could be in breach of equality legislation over the decision not to renew Uber’s licence in London, a former adviser has warned.
The Mayor of London was told on Saturday that because more than 90 per cent of the 40,000 drivers are from ethnic minority backgrounds, the move has destroyed a “lifeline” for them.
The taxi app has announced it will take court action against Transport for London’s (TfL) ban, which is due to come into force next Saturday.
TfL claimed the service was “not fit and proper” to hold a licence amid allegations of sex crimes by its drivers, but women’s charities fear passenger safety will be put at risk.
On Saturday a petition to reinstate Uber had more than 590,000 signatures.
Iqbal Wahhab, former chairman of the Department of Work and P…

If AI takes over the world, capitalism may well not survive

If AI takes over the world, capitalism may well not survive
Ken Chu says it is time to think about what form of economy and society can ensure that we get the most out of AI and robots, to defend against future human joblessness and tech titans cornering all the riches
By Ken Chu PUBLISHED: Sunday, 30 July, 2017, 8:46am
New technologies are advancing at a rate never seen before. Many people are gravely concerned that humans will soon be displaced by artificial intelligence, robots and all kinds of cutting-edge automation. Take the driverless vehicles under testing. If cars are self-driving and accident-proof, would we need drivers or even insurance? Will such technology put us out of work?
Telsa CEO and SpaceX founder Elon Musk has even warned that we should start regulating AI because it might pose great existential threat to humanity. To some, this is unfounded paranoia.
Undeniably AI and robots will revolutionise our way of life, our labour market and our economy. And many of the …