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Robots interviewing graduates for jobs at top city firms as students practice how to impress AI - ‘don’t apply for a job, just do an interview and we will match you to the best job’."

Robots interviewing graduates for jobs at top city firms as students practice how to impress AI
Prestigious city graduate schemes are increasingly using robots to conduct interviews
By Camilla Turner, education editor 21 APRIL 2018 • 5:21PM
As a nervous university student keen to make a good impression, you would be forgiven for wanting to comb your hair, polish your shoes and maybe even clean your teeth before a job interview.
But this kind of preparation could soon become a thing of the past, as prestigious city graduate schemes - including Goldman Sachs and Unilever - are increasingly using robots to conduct interviews.
Rather than sitting in front of an interviewer, students are asked to set up a webcam on their computer or phone. Questions pop up on the screen, and they are asked to make a video recording of their answers.
Thousands of videos are then scanned by powerful algorithms that can pick up what kinds of words or phrases you are using, how concisely you present your argu…

After Facebook scrutiny, is Google next?

After Facebook scrutiny, is Google next?
By RYAN NAKASHIMA AND MATT O'BRIEN Apr 21, 2018, 1:20 PM ET
MENLO PARK, Calif. — Facebook has taken the lion's share of scrutiny from Congress and the media about data-handling practices that allow savvy marketers and political agents to target specific audiences, but it's far from alone. YouTube, Google and Twitter also have giant platforms awash in more videos, posts and pages than any set of human eyes could ever check. Their methods of serving ads against this sea of content may come under the microscope next.
Advertising and privacy experts say a backlash is inevitable against a "Wild West" internet that has escaped scrutiny before. There continues to be a steady barrage of new examples where unsuspecting advertisers had their brands associated with extremist content on major platforms.
In the latest discovery, CNN reported that it found more than 300 retail brands, government agencies and technology companies had th…

Justice Department demands info from all four major US wireless carriers in probe of alleged collusion

Justice Department demands info from all four major US wireless carriers in probe of alleged collusion
·The Justice Department is looking into allegations of collusion in the wireless industry. ·A source tells CNBC the department's antitrust division has sent requests for information to all four major carriers: AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint. ·A source says the department previously investigated similar claims in 2016 and that a complaint from Apple was one factor that led to that probe.
By Christine WangPublished April 20, 2018
The Justice Department has reached out to all four major U.S. wireless carriers as part of an antitrust investigation, a person close to the situation told CNBC.
The source said that the department sent letters to AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile and Sprint in February requesting information.
The person also said the Justice Department previously examined this matter in 2016, but ended up dropping the investigation. A source said that Apple filed a compla…

China's Xi says internet control key to stability

China's Xi says internet control key to stability
Reuters • April 21, 2018
SHANGHAI (Reuters) - China must strengthen its grip on the internet to ensure broader social and economic goals are met, state news agency Xinhua reported on Saturday citing comments from President Xi Jinping, underlining a hardening attitude towards online content.
Under Xi's rule China has increasingly tightened its grip on the internet, concerned about losing influence and control over a younger generation who are driving a diverse and vibrant online culture from livestreaming to blogs.
"Without web security there's no national security, there's no economic and social stability, and it's difficult to ensure the interests of the broader masses," Xinhua cited Xi as saying.
"We cannot let the internet become a platform for disseminating harmful information and stirring up trouble with rumours," he added in comments made at a cyber security conference in Beijing, Xinhua s…

U.S. Said to Investigate AT&T and Verizon Over Wireless Collusion Claim

U.S. Said to Investigate AT&T and Verizon Over Wireless Collusion Claim
By CECILIA KANG APRIL 20, 2018
WASHINGTON — The Justice Department has opened an antitrust investigation into potential coordination by AT&T, Verizon and a telecommunications standards organization to hinder consumers from easily switching wireless carriers, according to six people with knowledge of the inquiry.
In February, the Justice Department issued demands to AT&T, Verizon and the G.S.M.A., a mobile industry standards-setting group, for information on potential collusion to thwart a technology known as eSIM, said two of the people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the details are confidential.
The technology lets people remotely switch wireless providers without having to insert a new SIM card into a device. AT&T and Verizon face accusations that they colluded with the G.S.M.A. to try to establish standards that would allow them to lock a device to their network even if it had…

Asian push to crack down on 'fake news' sparks alarm

Asian push to crack down on 'fake news' sparks alarm
Critics say anti-fake news laws made by governments with an authoritarian streak are aimed more at stifling dissent
By Sam Reeves AFP • April 19, 2018
Inflammatory stories masquerading as real news pose a particularly toxic threat in Asian countries with long-standing religious and ethnic divides, but promises by some regional leaders to tackle the problem carry equal menace.
Borrowing from US President Donald Trump's political playbook, government heads with an authoritarian streak are using the mantra of "fake news" to shield themselves from negative media coverage, and push legislation that critics say is aimed more at stifling dissent than punishing fabrication.
The problem they profess to be addressing is a genuine one.
Internet penetration is now so extensive -- even in the poorest areas -- that fake stories dressed up as fact can go viral on social media overnight and reach massive audiences with often …

Facebook starts its facial recognition push to Europeans

Facebook starts its facial recognition push to Europeans
By Natasha April 20, 2018
Facebook users in Europe are reporting that the company has started giving them the option to turn on its controversial facial recognition technology.
Jimmy Nsubuga, a journalist at Metro, is among several European Facebook users who have reporting getting notifications asking if they want to turn on face recognition technology.
Facebook has previously said an opt-in option would be pushed out to all European users, and also globally, as part of changes to its T&Cs and consent flow.
In Europe the company is hoping to convince users to voluntarily allow it to deploy the privacy-hostile tech — which was turned off in the bloc after regulatory pressure, back in 2012, when Facebook began using facial recognition to offer features such as automatically tagging users in photo uploads.
But under impending changes to its T&Cs — ostensibly to comply with the EU’s incoming GDPR data protection standard —…

Analysts worry Apple iPhone sales are even worse than they thought

Analysts worry Apple iPhone sales are even worse than they thought
Bank of America Merrill Lynch and J.P. Morgan warn their clients that Apple's iPhone sales may come in below expectations.
Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing said Thursday that its revenue guidance range for the second quarter is $7.8 billion to $7.9 billion versus the Wall Street estimate of $8.8 billion. The firm blamed "weak demand" in the mobile sector for its forecast.
"Given TSM's guidance, we could see some additional downside to iPhone units,"
Tae Kim April 19, 2018 Updated
A disappointing forecast from a key Apple chipmaking partner has some Wall Street analysts worried about iPhone sales forecasts.
On Thursday Bank of America Merrill Lynch and J.P. Morgan warned their clients that Apple's iPhone sales may come in below expectations.
Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing (TSMC) said Thursday that its revenue guidance range for the second quarter is $7.8 billion to $7.9 billion ve…

Bill Gates backs a $1 billion plan to cover Earth in 'Big Brother' satellites capable of streaming 'live and unfiltered' HD footage of the planet

Bill Gates backs a $1 billion plan to cover Earth in 'Big Brother' satellites capable of streaming 'live and unfiltered' HD footage of the planet·Japanese firm Softbank and aerospace giant Airbus are also backing the project ·500-strong network of spacecraft will monitor Earth with and livestream video ·Applications could including tracking illegal fishing, monitoring the weather and tracking natural migrations globally  By JOE PINKSTONE FOR MAILONLINE PUBLISHED: 12:51 EDT, 19 April 2018 | UPDATED: 15:19 EDT, 19 April 2018
Microsoft's Bill Gates is backing a start-up that will provide 'live and unfiltered' high definition footage of every inch of Earth. The startup, EarthNow, plans to launch 500 satellites to cover Earth's atmosphere in 'Big Brother' real-time video surveillance. As well as Gates, SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son and aerospace giant Airbus are also backing the project.  The price of the project could run to $1 billion (£700m), although the va…

Jeff Bezos reveals Amazon has 100 million Prime members

Jeff Bezos reveals Amazon has 100 million Prime members in letter to shareholders
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has released his latest annual shareholder letter. Bezos has published a shareholder letter every year since 1997. The shareholder letter is considered a must-read by many business professionals.
By Eugene Kim April 18, 2018 Updated CNBC.com
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos has released his latest annual shareholder letter.
In the letter, Bezos stressed the importance of having high standards in running a business. By setting high standards, companies are able to live up to "ever-rising customer expectations," he said.
"How do you stay ahead of ever-rising customer expectations? There's no single way to do it – it's a combination of many things. But high standards (widely deployed and at all levels of detail) are certainly a big part of it," Bezos wrote in the letter.
Bezos also disclosed for the first time that Prime now exceeds 100 million members worldwide. In 2…

Centuries worth of rare earth elements found in Japan's EEZ

Centuries worth of rare earth elements found in Japan's EEZ
By TAKAHIRO TAKENOUCHI/ Staff Writer April 17, 2018 at 17:45 JST
Massive deposits of rare earth minerals that could meet global demand for centuries have been found in Japan's exclusive economic zone off the Ogasawara island chain 2,000 kilometers southwest of Tokyo, researchers said.
The deposits, estimated at 16 million tons, lie at a depth of 5,700 meters about 250 km south of Minami-Torishima island in the Pacific Ocean.
The discovery was announced by a team that involved Waseda University, the University of Tokyo and the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and technology (JAMSTEC).
Researchers said it was reasonable to expect that technology could be developed in the near future to extract the deposits in viable quantities.
The team discovered traces of seabed deposits with a high concentration of rare earth elements in the area in 2013.
"The finding proves that there is an abundance of rare earth materia…

Pentagon wants to spot illnesses by monitoring soldiers’ smartphones

Pentagon wants to spot illnesses by monitoring soldiers’ smartphones
The U.S. military hopes to have an app someday that can detect illness in service members.
By Aaron Gregg April 15 at 9:00 AM
Imagine that your smartphone’s camera, microphone and motion sensors were monitoring you for signs of illness. That’s the future envisioned by scientists at the Pentagon’s secretive weapons development arm, where such a system is being built to keep tabs on deployed U.S. service members.
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency announced Thursday that it has awarded a $5.1 million contract to the Fairfax, Va.-based cybersecurity company Kryptowire to develop what DARPA calls the “Warfighter Analytics using Smartphones for Health” program, or WASH for short. The app would be used to spot diseases based on data that it collects from a person’s smartphone.
Tom Karygiannis, Kryptowire’s vice president of product, said he hopes the technology can one day broaden access to health care by spot…

Apple Is Planning to Launch a News Subscription Service

Apple Is Planning to Launch a News Subscription Service
Company integrating Texture purchase into Apple News offering About 20 Texture staff were cut soon after Apple acquisition
By Mark Gurman and Gerry Smith April 17, 2018, 4:00 AM PDT
Apple Inc. plans to integrate recently acquired magazine app Texture into Apple News and debut its own premium subscription offering, according to people familiar with the matter. The move is part of a broader push by the iPhone maker to generate more revenue from online content and services.
The Cupertino, California company agreed last month to buy Texture, which lets users subscribe to more than 200 magazines for $9.99 a month. Apple cut about 20 Texture staff soon after, according to one of the people.
The world’s largest technology company is integrating Texture technology and the remaining employees into its Apple News team, which is building the premium service. An upgraded Apple News app with the subscription offering is expected to launch wi…

Robot to run for mayor in Japan in 'world first' promising 'fairness and balance' for all residents

Robot to run for mayor in Japan in 'world first' promising 'fairness and balance' for all residents
The robot mayor promises to statistically analyse petitions put forward to the council and settle conflicts between its citizens
By Abigail O'Leary and Anna Verdon 12:20, 17 APR 2018 UPDATED
A robot has been nominated to run for the position of mayor in Tokyo, promising to be "fair and balanced" to all its constituents.
The mayoral election in Tama City features the usual high-ranking local politicians, as well as an artificial intelligence candidate competing alongside its human counterparts.
Posters plastered across the district feature the faces of smiling party leaders, with slogans promising change for the city.
And in line with election propaganda, the robot nominee, dubbed Michihito Matsuda, has branded vans, posters and inspirational soundbites.
The futuristic looking nominee appears female in her features, with an entirely silver body.
In a bid to…

Supreme Court takes up internet sales tax case

Paying billions more online: Supreme Court takes up internet sales tax case
The justices will decide whether to overturn 50 years' worth of rulings barring states from imposing sales taxes on whatever their residents buy from out-of-state retailers.
by Pete Williams Apr.16.2018 / 9:38 AM ET
WASHINGTON — Consumers nationwide would pay more for what they buy online if South Dakota gets its way before the U.S. Supreme Court in a case to be argued Tuesday.
The justices will decide whether to overturn 50 years' worth of rulings that forbid states from imposing sales taxes on whatever their residents buy from out-of-state retailers. Ending the ban could bring billions of dollars in new revenue to the states.
President Donald Trump gave the issue renewed visibility when he tweeted in early April that Amazon pays "little or no taxes to state & local governments." That wasn't correct: The company has collected taxes since April 1, 2017, on sales to customers in the s…

Facebook Photo-Scanning Suit Is a Multibillion-Dollar Threat

Facebook Photo-Scanning Suit Is a Multibillion-Dollar Threat
Class-action ruling is major win for users under Illinois law Judge notes company’s worry about exposure to large damages
By Joel Rosenblatt April 16, 2018, 3:11 PM PDT Updated
Facebook Inc. may have to pay a real price for claims it invaded users’ privacy: billions of dollars.
A federal judge ruled Monday that millions of the social network’s users can proceed as a group with claims that its photo-scanning technology violated an Illinois law by gathering and storing biometric data without their consent. Damages could be steep -- a fact that wasn’t lost on the judge, who was unsympathetic to Facebook’s arguments for limiting its legal exposure.
The case dates back to 2015, long before Facebook became mired in controversy over revelations that millions of its users’ private information fell into the hands of British consulting firm Cambridge Analytica. It’s rare for consumers to win class-action status in privacy cases. In …